Our ‘Gastronomic World’ has changed – and the change is here to stay

Our Gastronomic World has changed

We eat for nutrition, but we also eat for taste. Since we eat so often, our taste buds tire of the same stimuli quickly – they crave variety and we don’t mind paying a premium for a great gastronomic experience.

Oh, our tingling taste buds! We eat for nutrition, but we also eat for taste. Since we eat so often, our taste buds tire of the same stimuli quickly- they crave variety. Our other senses – of smell, of sight, too seek change, ever so often. This has led to a surge in the out-of-home consumption of food. This has also led to a surge in order-ins. We don’t mind paying a premium for a great gastronomic experience. We would like to have many such experiences in a month, perhaps even within a week- but different experiences. We want variety. And we don’t mind paying for it.

With growing prosperity more of us can pay, and with growing awareness or perhaps with social media-fed voyeurism, also the desire. This has led to a mushrooming of restaurants, QSRs, cafes, bars, and bakeries. I have seen this in India, in Singapore, in Indonesia, in Vietnam, in Saudi Arabia, in Nigeria.

COVID has put a spanner in the spokes. Weeks of lockdown, of being confined indoors, of being suspicious of strangers, of being suspicious of friends, has changed our world, especially our gastronomic world. A new normal has set in. And it is here to stay.

When things open up, will you still want to go out to eat with your four-year-old in tow? Will you still want to step out for a cold beer and a bite with your 75-year-old Dad? Perhaps you will, but only to outlets where you are sure of the safety. And perhaps not as often. That there will be serious demand destruction for out-of-home dining I am certain of, consequently. For these outlets, the costs of operations will rise too with higher safety standards. It is a double whammy not many will survive.

So will you then order-in? This certainly will reduce the risk of exposure to the virus. But will it eliminate the risk, I think not. I know I will have a niggling doubt about the safety of food being ordered-in. I will also worry about the person who is delivering the food. There will be more people like me. Order-ins too will get impacted. Deliveroo has slashed its workforce by a quarter in Singapore. Swiggy has cut 1000 jobs in India. Order-ins will not hit a wall, as will out-of-home dining, but the new normal will see the demand dampen.

This will put you and me in a fix. The out-of-home options available to satiate our taste buds, we will no longer trust as much. But the taste buds will still tingle. I reckon, more and more of us will turn to our kitchens. We will cook, bake, brew, and grill more at home. With work-from-home nowhere to stay, we will have more time at our hands – that will help. We will turn master chefs, many will engage our children too. We will bring in groceries, ingredients, or perhaps we will order them in. We will also appreciate ready-to-cook preparations that will take the drudgery away from cooking. Tomato purées, pre-blended spices, frying batter, etc will all be welcome.

Now the question is for how long will this last? I think this will last for quite a while. We don’t know how the lockdown exits are going to pan out. Will we see rising infections as we exit, hence more lockdowns? Perhaps we will. What I am certain of is that our food consumption pattern will change. Companies focused on in-home food preparation will rise with the tide, those focused on out-of-home food consumption will be at risk with the ebb.

Share this post

Subscribe
Notify of
0 Comments
Inline Feedbacks
View all comments
Send an Inquiry
close slider

Send us your inquiry or question

Disclaimer: Avalon Consulting does not collect any information without consent. The information you provide will remain confidential and will not be shared with any 3rd party agencies. We will use this information to only contact you directly for enquiries/responses.